How Security Experts Are Protecting Their Own Data

Today the San Jose Mercury News asked several prominent security experts which security products they were actually using for their own data. An anonymous Slashdot reader writes: The EFF’s chief technologist revealed that he doesn’t run an anti-virus program, partly because he’s using Linux, and partly because he feels anti-virus software creates a false sense of security. (“I don’t like to get complacent and rely on it in any way…”) He does regularly encrypt his e-mail, “but he doesn’t recommend that average users scramble their email, because he thinks theRead More

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Google Tests A Software That Judges Hollywood's Portrayal of Women

Slashdot reader theodp writes: Aside from it being hosted in a town without a movie theater, the 2016 Bentonville Film Festival was also unusual in that it required all entrants to submit “film scripts and downloadable versions of the film” for judgment by “the team at Google and USC”, apparently part of a larger Google-funded research project with USC Engineering “to develop a computer science tool that could quickly and efficiently assess how women are represented in films”… Fest reports noted that representatives of Google and the White House OfficeRead More

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100 Arrested In New York Thanks To Better Face-Recognition Technology

New York doubled the number of “measurement points” used by their facial recognitation technology this year, leading to 100 arrests for fraud and identity theft, plus another 900 open cases. An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: In all, since New York implemented facial recognition technology in 2010, more than 14,000 people have been hampered trying to get multiple licenses. The newly upgraded system increases the measurement points of a driver’s license picture from 64 to 128. The DMV said this vastly improves its chances of matching newRead More

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New Ransomware Poses As A Windows Update

Slashdot reader MojoKid quotes an article from Hot Hardware: A security researcher for AVG has discovered a new piece of ransomware called Fantom that masquerades as a critical Windows update. Victims who fall for the ruse will see a Windows screen acting like it’s installing the update, but what’s really happening is that the user’s documents and files are being encrypted in the background… The scam starts with a pop-up labeled as a critical update from Microsoft. Once a user decides to apply the fake update, it extracts files andRead More

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Kim Dotcom Will Revive Megaupload, Linking File Transfers To Bitcoin Microtransactions

Long-time Slashdot reader SonicSpike quotes an article from Fortune: The controversial entrepreneur Kim Dotcom said last month that he was preparing to relaunch Megaupload, the file-sharing site that U.S. and New Zealand authorities dramatically shut down in 2012, with bitcoins being involved in some way… This system will be called Bitcache, and Dotcom claimed its launch would send the bitcoin price soaring way above its current $575 value. The launch of Megaupload 2.0 will take place on January 20, 2017, he said, urging people to “buy bitcoin while cheap, likeRead More

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EU Copyright Reform Proposes Search Engines Pay For Snippets

An anonymous Slashdot reader reports that the European Commission “is planning reforms that would allow media outlets to request payment from search engines such as Google, for publishing snippets of their content in search results.” The Stack reports: The working paper recommends the introduction of an EU law that covers the rights to digital reproduction of news publications. This would essentially make news publishers a new category of rights holders under copyright law, thereby ensuring that “the creative and economic contribution of news publishers is recognized and incentivized in EURead More

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WikiLeaks malware causes problems for unsuspecting users

When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange created his organization in 2006, he leaked thousands of documents that alleged government misconduct. It caused a storm of controversy worldwide, and as the years have passed and the cache of sensitive documents has grown, more people are paying attention to the internet sensation that is WikiLeaks. However, the massive popularity of the WikiLeaks documents is now working to its users’ detriment. What’s wrong with WikiLeaks? Gizmodo contributor Michael Nunez reported mid-August that the organization had published more than 80 strains of malware in itsRead More

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Apple Fixes Three Zero Days Used In Targeted Attack

Trailrunner7 quotes a report from On The Wire: Apple has patched three critical vulnerabilities in iOS that were identified when an attacker targeted a human rights activist in the UAE with an exploit chain that used the bugs to attempt to remotely jailbreak and infect his iPhone. The vulnerabilities include two kernel flaws and one in WebKit and Apple released iOS 9.3.5 to fix them. The attack that set off the investigation into the vulnerabilities targeted Ahmed Mansoor, an activist living in the UAE. Earlier this month, he received aRead More

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Apples Fixes Three Zero Days Used In Targeted Attack

Trailrunner7 quotes a report from On The Wire: Apple has patched three critical vulnerabilities in iOS that were identified when an attacker targeted a human rights activist in the UAE with an exploit chain that used the bugs to attempt to remotely jailbreak and infect his iPhone. The vulnerabilities include two kernel flaws and one in WebKit and Apple released iOS 9.3.5 to fix them. The attack that set off the investigation into the vulnerabilities targeted Ahmed Mansoor, an activist living in the UAE. Earlier this month, he received aRead More

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Japanese Government Plans Cyber Attack Institute

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Stack: The government of Japan will create an institute to train employees to counter cyber attacks. The institute, which will be operational early next year, will focus on preventing cyber attacks on electrical systems and other infrastructure. The training institute, which will operate as part of Japan’s Information Technology Promotion Agency (IPA), is the first center for training in Japan to focus on preventing cyber attacks. A government source said that the primary aims will be preventing a large-scale blackout during theRead More

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'Social Media ID, Please?' Proposed US Law Greeted With Anger

The U.S. government announced plans to require some foreign travelers to provide their social media account names when entering the country — and in June requested comments. Now the plan is being called “ludicrous,” an “all-around bad idea,” “blatant overreach,” “desperate, paranoid heavy-handedness,” “preposterous,” “appalling,” and “un-American,” reports Slashdot reader dcblogs: That’s just a sampling of the outrage. Some 800 responded to the U.S. request for comments about a proposed rule affecting people traveling from “visa waiver” countries to the U.S., where a visa is not required. This includes mostRead More

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BitTorrent Cases Filed By Malibu Media Will Proceed, Rules Judge

Long-time Slashdot reader NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: In the federal court for the Eastern District of New York, where all Malibu Media cases have been stayed for the past year, the Court has lifted the stay and denied the motion to quash in the lead case, thus permitting all 84 cases to move forward. In his 28-page decision (PDF), Magistrate Judge Steven I. Locke accepted the representations of Malibu’s expert, one Michael Patzer from a company called Excipio, that in detecting BitTorrent infringement he relies on “direct detection” rather than “indirect detection”,Read More

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HAARP Holds Open House To Dispel Rumors Of Mind Control

An anonymous Slashdot reader writes: HAARP — the former Air Force/Navy/DARPA research program in Alaska — will host an open house Saturday where “We hope to show people that it is not capable of mind control and not capable of weather control and all the other things it’s been accused of…” said Sue Mitchell, spokesperson for the geophysical institute at the University of Alaska. “We hope that people will be able to see the actual science of it.” HAARP, which was turned over to The University of Alaska last August,Read More

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Eavesdropping On Tinder: Researcher Demonstrates Man-in-the-Middle Attacks

An anonymous Slashdot reader writes: Security expert Anthony Zboralski posted on HERT a social engineering attack for Tinder that lets you perform a man-in-the-middle attack against unsuspecting users. Zboralski says, “Not only we can eavesdrop on the conversation of two strangers, we can also change their reality.” The attack can easily be extended to SMS, Whatsapp, iMessage and voice. “At some point people exchange phone numbers and the Tinder convo stops. That’s not a problem…” Zboralski explains, suggesting more ways to continue the man-in-the-middle exploits.. His article drew a responseRead More

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Case Study: Cut Mobile Data Costs and Bolster Security

Discover how Hillcrest identified and addressed its mobile data usage problem, and now is enjoying annual savings of roughly €34,700, equating to an 850% ROI. Learn how it cut its mobile bills by 68% and also protects its workers from browser malware, leaking apps, phishing attacks, poisoned cache exploits, and more. Published by: Wandera Source: sec news whitepapers

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Quantifying the Riskand Economic Impactof Bad Bots

Learn how to mitigate the threat of bad bots to your enterprise’s sites. Discover vital information on issues faced by sites due to bad bots, such as web scraping, security breaches, spam, skewed analytics, and more. Published by: Distil Networks Source: sec news whitepapers

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The New Security Paradigm for Enabling Digital Workers: 4 Pillars of Success

Security in the digital age should be increasingly fine-grained, broad-based, targeted, convenient, and intrinsic to products and applications. Uncover immediate steps you can begin taking to better prepare for ongoing security challenges due to the cloud, mobility, and more. Published by: Unisys Source: sec news whitepapers

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Maximize Online Archiving Security

Discover how using email archival is vital to enterprises looking to secure their records and leave nothing to chance. Learn how a cloud-based service can remove many of the costs, concerns and complexities associated with on-premises email solutions, including the setup, management and monitoring of email servers. Published by: LogicNow Source: sec news whitepapers

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Apple, Facebook, IBM, and Microsoft Sign White House Pledge For Equal Pay

In honor of Women’s Equality Day, an anonymous reader shares with us a festive report from Fortune: More than two months after the White House first announced its Equal Pay Pledge for the private sector, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft and other major industry players have signed on. By taking the pledge, which was first introduced at the United State of Women Summit in June of this year, companies promise to help close the national gender pay gap, conduct annual, company-wide pay analyses, and review hiring and promotion practices. The new signeesRead More

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British Companies Are Selling Advanced Spy Tech To Authoritarian Regimes

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Motherboard: Since early 2015, over a dozen UK companies have been granted licenses to export powerful telecommunications interception technology to countries around the world, Motherboard has learned. Many of these exports include IMSI-catchers, devices which can monitor large numbers of mobile phones over broad areas. Some of the UK companies were given permission to export their products to authoritarian states such as Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, and Egypt; countries with poor human rights records that have been well-documented to abuseRead More

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